Franck Jobard

RC Man

My interest in astronomy started when I was a child, using simple binoculars to observe the moon. I bought my first 4.5” telescope when I was only 12. Thanks to that not-so-great little scope I could observe Saturn’s rings and try and see the great impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy hurting Jupiter in 1994! 

Later, I had the opportunity to observe the sky using the 6.3” refractor located in my high school and in the much better 16” in Besançon observatory!

My passion for astronomy never stopped and, when I reached the adult age, I decided to build my own backyard observatory. I bought some astrophotography equipment and, in 2016, I discovered Jo1, my first planetary nebula. I now specialize in light polluted images processing.

Mikel Martinez

Pixi Guru

The north of Spain, where I was born and where I still live now, is not the most conducive place to become interested in astronomy. Despite that, I have been fascinated by space ever since I can remember. I kept looking at the photographs of distant galaxies, nebulae and other celestial objects, that appeared in the magazines and books that came to my hands. At that time, who would have told me that one day I would be able to take such photographs?

For a long period, despite never abandoning my interest in astronomy, life took me to other matters. But 10 years ago, I started to get involved in astrophotography when I saw how the techniques improved and made it possible for amateurs to take photographs as good or better than those I saw in my childhood. And that's what I'm still doing today : trying to capture those few photons reaching us from so far away... If you speak spanish you can have a look at my astrophotography blog.

Marian Gutowski

Star Chaser

My interest in astronomy dates back to my teen age when my friend Olivier made me discover sky splendors with his telescope! What a feeling of excitement when, for the first time, I watched M42, the Great Orion’s Nebula in the eyepiece of his Newton 150/750! And then years passed… I was focused on my studies, my work and my family… 

I came back to astronomy three decades later, in 2014, and I was stomached by the progresses made in amateur astronomy. Astrophotography was possible with great results thanks to goto, guiding, astrometry, ccd, softwares etc… My equipment evolved from Celestron C8 and C11 EdgeHD to an Astrophysics refractor and some Ritchey-Chretien Cassegrain telescopes, mounts such as Skywatcher NEQ6 / AZEQ6 or AP100 and CCD Cameras from Atik and Moravian. I was greatly impressed by images produced by amateurs such as Thierry Legault, Nicolas Outters, Jérôme Rudelle, Laurent Bourgon (Ciel Boreal / Austral) and others… so I decided to join the Astro Images Processing Association.

In the summer of 2017 an opportunity arose to image remotely from Cedric’s observatory, located in Ardèche, in the south of France and to join his team, our team, the Deep Sky Team.

Cédric Thomas

Remote Guy

As far back as I can remember, I have always been drawn to astronomy. A bad plastic refractor brought by Santa Claus when I was 8 almost killed my interest for the night sky forever, but astronomy magazines and books by Hubert Reeves got rid of that frustration! 

In 1995, at 16, I took my first astro photographs using my dad's old Olympus OM10 : The amazing Hale-Bopp comet. Ten years later, in 2005, I looked in the eyepiece of a large telescope for the first time (a Meade LX200 16"). It was in Borobia, a small village in Spain. At the time, I was living in Madrid and I was looking for an observation spot to test my first telescope, a Celestron C11. Thanks to my friend Julio and my first view at M13, Hercules globular cluster, in the C11, I knew that astronomy was my thing. Shortly after, the first qualitative and affordable digital SLR appeared on the market: the famous Canon 350d. I didn't need more to become addicted to this new discipline: astrophotography.

In 2008, when I returned to France, I built my remote backyard observatory: Le Petit Borobia. The observatory now houses my setup, but also Mikel’s and Marian’s. Thanks to the Internet, we all control our equipment from a distance...